Ocean Recovery Alliance

Ocean Recovery Alliance News

Plastic Whale Breaches for Sky

By Straits Times Singapore

- Published on November 8, 2019 by Straits Times Singapore

“Who knew that diving among a bunch of plastic trash would become the catalyst for Doug Woodring to eventually be nominated and voted in as an Honor Administrator in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame? That is the long road that Doug has taken from diving along the coastlines of Asia to being inducted in the Hall of Fame in Fort Lauderdale, Florida,” asked Steven Munatones.

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Plastic Whale Breaches for Sky
Woodring from Ocean Recovery Alliance Honored in Int'l Swimming Hall of Fame

By Mark Agnew

- Published on October 30, 2019 by South China Morning Post

Hong Kong open-water swimming race organiser and environmental entrepreneur Doug Woodring has been given a place in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame (IMSHOF). He has been at the forefront of initiatives to develop the sport and protect the marine environment, the IMSHOF said. Woodring, who used to work at Merrill Lynch Asset Management, started his journey to environmental activism when he began to organise swimming events.

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Woodring from Ocean Recovery Alliance Honored in Int'l Swimming Hall of Fame
Int'l Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame

By Steve Munatones

- Published on October 28, 2019 by Open Water Swimming

“Who knew that diving among a bunch of plastic trash would become the catalyst for Doug Woodring to eventually be nominated and voted in as an Honor Administrator in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame? That is the long road that Doug has taken from diving along the coastlines of Asia to being inducted in the Hall of Fame in Fort Lauderdale, Florida,” asked Steven Munatones.

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Int'l Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame
Wharton Journal - Trade Borders

By Doug Woodring and Trish Hyde

- Published on July 17, 2019 by Wharton Journal

Modern economic theory maintains that countries should optimize the trade of global goods and services by embracing other nations’ competitive advantages—letting others excel where their advantages exist. What it did not account for is the trade of “bads” between nations, whereby a country sends unwanted materials (in this case, waste) to another’s shores to take advantage of that country’s competitive advantages (low labor costs and lax environmental enforcement). This trade of bads was widely adopted in the case of waste recovery and recycling partly because developed countries haven’t established on-shore solutions for processing at the same rate they’ve created trash, due to high processing costs within their borders.

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Wharton Journal - Trade Borders
 

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